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South Camberley Primary & Nursery School

South Camberley

Primary & Nursery School

Maths

We love maths at South Camberley

Some people think maths isn’t fun and creative but not maths at our school. We use problem solving within all our maths lessons and use manipulatives to help us learn. This helps us to see the mathematical problem more clearly which helps us work out an answer. We use real-life problems to investigate mathematical concepts and use more than one way to solve a problem. At South Camberley we like to work together so we often work in partners or small groups to tackle our maths. This means we share our learning with each other and can learn more.

How do we teach maths at South Camberley?

Our maths teaching follows the mastery curriculum using ‘Singapore style’ maths. This is at the heart of the National Curriculum and encourages the use of the concrete-pictorial-abstract (CPA) approach. We use DfE recommended textbooks and workbooks - Maths No Problem in Year 1 – Year 5, which ensures our children have clear progression across mathematical concepts, year by year and lesson by lesson. We give our children the opportunity to deepen their understanding through pre-planned challenges.

Using the Maths No Problem scheme ensures our lessons flow through a number of core parts, and with additional fluency and consolidation and deepening activities, means that pupils:

  • Are taught mathematical concepts in depth to ensure a secure understanding
  • Are given time to think deeply about maths at a relational level rather than as a set of rules and procedures
  • Are taught inclusively, with exposure to multiple methods of solving a problem, building self-confidence and resilience in the children
  • Are challenged with rich and sophisticated problems in the topic if they have grasped a concept quickly
  • Are provided with additional support to consolidate their understanding before moving on

A Maths lesson at South Camberley

Our lessons start with a short practice of known concepts. This short starter allows children to practice skills already taught and helps develop recall and accuracy.  

Each lesson uses an open-ended problem as a starting point for learning. Children are given time to work alone or with a partner to tackle the problem. Children use the concrete-pictorial- abstract approach which supports deep understanding and allows children to come up with multiple strategies for the problem. Teachers will question the children during this activity, allowing more exploration and articulation.

Children will then move on to practice further questions with a partner using the explored strategies. These questions become increasingly more difficult, extending the lesson objective. Using the mastery approach encourages the children to explore their thinking using manipulatives and pictorial representations before moving onto the abstract. For quicker learners, this allows them the chance to explore more methods using mathematical explanations and reasoning.

The Maths No Problem workbooks then provide our children with the opportunity to work independently to practice, consolidate and deepen their understanding of the lesson so far. The questions will reinforce new understanding and progress through familiar strategies to unfamiliar problems that develop a deeper understanding of the lesson objective.

Building strong foundations for our children

Early Years Foundation Expectations for Reception and Nursery 

Year 1 to 6 National Curriculum Expectations

The following videos explain some of the fundamental concepts in maths including counting, number bonds, subtraction, mental calculations, multiplication and long division. The final two videos explain how effective the bar model can be in supporting children’s understanding of maths problems at a wide range of levels. The bar model is a way of modelling a maths problem through a picture (or pictorial representation).

Fundmental Idea

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Dr Yeap talks about one of the fundamental ideas in mathematics: that items can only be counted, added, and subtracted if they have the same nouns. He uses a simple example with concrete objects, chocolates and glue sticks to illustrate the point and then shows how it relates to column addition and the addition of fractions.

Number Bonds

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Dr. Yeap explains how young children can use concrete materials and later use pictorial representations as number bonds. Number bonds represent how numbers can be split up into their component parts. Children can explore number bonds using a variety of concrete materials, such as counters with containers and ten frames or with symbols.

Subtraction

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Dr. Yeap explains how standard column subtraction can be taught meaningfully by using children's knowledge of number bonds. Once children can explain how numbers can be split into their component parts, they can adapt their understanding to the conventional column subtraction method.

Mental Calculations

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Dr. Yeap discusses how children can develop an ability to calculate the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) in their heads without the use of paper and pencil or calculators.

Multiplication

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Dr. Yeap discusses how children can learn their times tables meaningfully by using visualisation and other strategies.

Mental Calculations

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Dr. Yeap discusses how children can develop an ability to calculate the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) in their heads without the use of paper and pencil or calculators.

Long Division

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Dr Yeap discusses how children can learn to do long division meaningfully by first using concrete apparatus, such as base-10 materials, to perform the operations. They can then explore how this idea is represented in the long division algorithm.

Bar Model 1

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Dr. Yeap discusses how diagrams can be used to represent a situation in a problem: such as rectangles representing (unknown) quantities. This method of visualising problems is known as the bar model.

Bar Model 2

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Dr. Yeap gives another example of the bar model: how diagrams can be used to represent situations in a problem.